35 Must-Know Filipino Greetings and Phrases for Travelers

➢ The 35 Must-Know Filipino Greetings and Phrases for travelers will assist newcomers (foreigners) and travelers to the Philippines with the basics in Filipino conversation. Majority of Filipinos speak the English language, but knowing common tagalog phrases will surely endear you to local folks.
35 Must-Know Filipino Greetings and Phrases for Travelers

The 35 Must-Know Filipino Greetings and Phrases for travelers

English Phrase Filipino Pronunciation Filipino Meaning
• Please pa-kee-OO-sap Pakiusap
• Can I try? poo-we-deh ko poh soo-boo-KAHN? Pwede ko po subukan?
• How are you? koo-MOOS-tah kah? Kumusta ka?
• Fine, thank you. ma-BOO-tee, sa-lah-mat. Mabuti, salamat.
• Good morning magan-dang oo-mah-gah Magandang umaga
• Good night magan-dang ga-bee Magandang gabi
• Good afternoon magan-dang tang-ha-lee Magandang tanghali
• Have a nice day magan-dang ah-rao Magandang araw
• I don't like it ah-yao koh Ayaw ko
• See you later kee-TAH ta-yoh mah-ma-yah Kita tayo mamaya

The 35 Must-Know Filipino Greetings will also help out expatriates and foreign exchange students acclimate to the language.

• I love You mah-HAL kee-TAH Mahal kita
• Happy Birthday mah-LEE-gah-yang ka-a-ra-wahn Maligayang Kaarawan
• Happy New Year mah-nee-gong bah-gong tah-ON! Manigong Bagong Taon!
• Merry Christmas mah-LEE-gah-yang pahs-kow! Maligayang Pasko!
• Congratulations! bee-nah-ba-tee kee-TAH! Binabati kita!
• Yes OH-poh Opo
• No HEEN-dee poh Hindi po
• Pardon Me ma-WAH-lahng GAH-lahng poh Mawalang galang po
• You're welcome WAH-lahng ah-noo-mahn poh Walang anuman po
• A minute please san-da-LEE poh Sandali po

The 35 Must-Know Filipino Greetings include scenarios during travel, store transactions, personal greetings and in public place interactions.

• Delicious! sa-RAHP! Sarap!
• I'm Sorry pa-oo-mahn-HEEN poh Paumanhin po
• Where? sa-AN poh? Saan po?
• When? KAE-lan poh? Kailan po?
• What? A-no poh? Ano po?
• You're beautiful ma-GAN-dah ka Maganda ka
• You're handsome goo-wa-POH ka Guwapo ka
• How much is this mag-ka-no poh ee-TOH? Magkano po ito?
• My change please sook-LEE ko poh? Sukli ko po?
• Water? TOO-beeg poh? Tubig po?
• Where's the restroom? SAH-ahn poh ang BAHN-yo? Saan po ang banyo?
• Friend kae-bee-GAHN Kaibigan
• I like you goos-TOH kee-TAH Gusto kita
• Money pe-RAH Pera
• Goodbye pa-AH-lam poh Paalam po

*Po (poh) denotes respect in Filipino customs.

written by Rock Punzalan for Pinoy Search Network
FAIR USE DISCLAIMER: The following data is for educational, scholarship review and archiving purposes only. By viewing this information, you release the website and its authors from any responsibility or liabilities. Though we verify and maintain the accuracy of the provided data, the absence of unintented typographical and factual errors cannot be guaranteed. Use the page at your own risk. For any suggestions, updates, credits or correction requests, contact us or comment below.
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The Six Nations which invaded the Philippines

The Six Nations which invaded the Philippines.
➢ History textbooks may have taught you that only three countries ever invaded the Philippines in known history. This information is false and misleading. Although it is partly true that Japan, the USA and Spain popularly subjugated the Filipino nation, there are other three minor invaders recorded to have conquered the Pinoy Islanders.
In reality, The Netherlands (Dutch), Portugal and the Great Britain (England) also briefly invaded the Philippines. Also, some other less known foreign cultures and factions temporarily encroached Philippine territories during the colonial and pre-colonial times.
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Photo Credits: Magellan from Wikimedia Commons and SCMP

SIX MAJOR INVADERS OF THE PHILIPPINES

IMPERIAL JAPAN 1941 - 1944

➢ The most recent invasion is attributed to Imperial Japan during World War II. A combined force of American and Filipino fighters resisted the full control of Japan of the Filipino nation. The Japanese takeover lasted from years 1941 to 1944. Eventually, Japan was soundly defeated together with Germany and Italy in the end by the combined military power of the Allied nations.
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Photo Credits: Credits: Flag from Sciencekids

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 1899 - 1946

➢ The United States of America entered the Pacific theater with the start of the Spanish-American War in April 25, 1898. Spain got obliterated by the USA in the Battle of Manila Bay on May 1 of the same year and subsequently sold their sovereignity of the Philippines for 20 million dollars in the Treaty of Paris. Resistance forces of the Philippine Republic prevented the complete annexation of the Americans which led to the Philippine-American war. The Moros and the Pulahanes also revolted against American rule. The war lasted from 1899 to 1913. America formally governed the Philippines up until 1946 when Japan was defeated and the USA relinquished sovereignity and control back to the Pinoys in the Treaty of Manila.
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Credits: Flag from Sciencekids

GREAT BRITAIN 1762 - 1764

➢ The Great Britain was dragged to the Philippine shores after Spain discreetly allied with France, an enemy of England during the Seven Years War. It was January 4, 1762 when England declared war against the Spaniards. Britain later annexed Manila and Cavite with its Indian regiment. England brought in a strong fleet of eight ships of line, three frigates and four ships. Manila was immediately occupied and pillaged. However, the combined forces of Spain and Filipino fighters prevented the complete control of the country by the British invaders. The Brits eventually withdrew control of the Philippines after the Treaty of Paris in 1763 but was only implemented in 1764 due to delays in correspondence.
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Credits: Flag from Sciencekids

NETHERLANDS · 1600, 1609, 1616, 1646

➢ After gaining its independence, the Dutch yearned to be an economic power by siezing Asian territories from western powers. They first tried to attack Filipino shores in years 1600, 1609 and in 1616 with all ending in defeat opposite superior Spanish navy. Afterwards, in 1646, the Netherlands and Spain engaged in a series of five naval skirmishes known as the Battles of La Naval de Manila. Initially, Spain was ill-prepared to fend-off the Dutch. The good thing was Spain did utilize the help of Filipino fighters, hence they stopped the Dutch from ever capturing Manila. Spain had 2 and later 3 aging Galleons against the might of the Hollanders who brought 3 naval squadrons consisting of 16 Galleons and other smaller ships. The Hollanders started by plundering and pillaging the homes of the Pangasinenses and the Ilocanos when they refused to revolt against the Spanish. One Dutch squadron attacked Zamboanga and eventually blockaded San Jacinto port in Ticao island but failed. The aftermath of the war saw the Dutch losing decisively against the superior tactics of the Spanish navy commanders. Despite having a much more powerful navy, the weak tactics of Netherlands led to their ultimate defeat in the Philippines.
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Credits: Flag from Sciencekids

PORTUGAL 1568

➢ Ever since Pope Alexander VI divided the known world for Spain and Portugal in Treaties Tordesillas and Zaragosa, both countries tried to outsmart one another in gaining territories for resources and power. Portugal surveyed the Philippine Colony in 1566 and warned the Spaniards in 1567 that it actually belonged to them and will retake it with a powerful armada. They came back in 1568 when Portuguese General Gonzalo de Pereira attacked the forces of Miguel Lopez de Legazpi in Cebu. Pereira blockaded the port of Cebu and attacked the settlement with guns and cannons. They burned a multitude of barangays and killed even children and women. However, Pereira retreated eventually even if he had the superior naval force. He feared that any losses incurred to his navy might mean losing Malacca, which also faced internal enemies. The attack in Cebu came as the last time Portugal attacked the Philippines. In 1580, Spain and Portugal were united as one nation after Portugal’s last sovereign royalty died, effectively uniting all the territories to Spain.
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Credits: Flag from Sciencekids

SPAIN 1565

➢ Spain subjugated the Philippines the longest compared to all other foreign adversaries. Although initially discovered by Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan in 1521, it was not until 1565 that Spain began the permanent colonization of the Philippines. In the same year, Ruy Lopez de Villalobos founded settlements in Cebu and Miguel Lopez de Legazpi returned in 1571 to formally annex and establish a city in Manila. Spain controlled the Philippines for 333 long years until their defeat to the Americans in 1898.
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Credits: Flag from Sciencekids

MINOR INVADERS OF THE PHILIPPINES

CHINESE PIRATES 1574 - 1575

➢ Chinese pirate Limahong tried to invade Ilocos Sur and then Manila (through Parañaque) in 1574. The Spaniards, under Spanish Captain Juan de Salcedo and Filipino Dol Galo repulsed the pirates under the command of Limahong and stopped them from ever invading Manila. Limahong, however laid siege and successfully established a fort and a stronghold in Lingayen Pangasinan in 1575, garnishing himself as a royal king. After exacting tributes from the natives of Pangasinan, Limahong ultimately retreated to China when the Spanish made a blockade of the Lingayen river and forced an inland skirmish against the beleaguered Chinese bucanneers.

CHINESE PIRATES 1662 - 1575

➢ Though ultimately unsuccessful in his ambition to invade the Philippines during the Spanish era, Zheng Chenggong aka “Koxinga” still raided several Philippine towns before his death. His threat to conquer the Philippine islands after annexing Taiwan during the Qing Dynasty resulted to the Spaniards concentrating their forces into Manila, thus abandoning the complete control and conquer of the Mindanao and Moro lands. This scenario also forced the Spanish to relinquish their hold of the Moluccas islands. An author, Tonio Andrade, theorized that Koxinga may have defeated the Spanish if he did not die abruptly.

OTHER NOTABLE PRE-COLONIZATION INVADERS OF THE PHILIPPINES


• INDONESIA – Sri Vijaya and Majapahit Empire
• BRUNEI – Sultan Kingdom of Brunei (around 1500 A.D.)
• MALAYSIA – Malacca Sultanate/Kingdom
• CHINA – Ma-I Mindoro Huangdom and Huangdom of Pangasinan

References

• Carioti, “The Zhengs’ Maritime Power in the International Context of the 17th Century Far East Seas: The Rise of a ‘Centralised Piratical Organisation’ and Its Gradual Development into an Informal ‘State'”, p. 41, n. 29.
• Andrade, Tonio (2005). “Chapter 10: The Beginning of the End”. How Taiwan Became Chinese: Dutch, Spanish, and Han Colonization in the Seventeenth Century. Columbia University Press.
written by Rock Punzalan for Pinoy Search Network
FAIR USE DISCLAIMER: The following data is for educational, scholarship review and archiving purposes only. By viewing this information, you release the website and its authors from any responsibility or liabilities. Though we verify and maintain the accuracy of the provided data, the absence of unintented typographical and factual errors cannot be guaranteed. Use the page at your own risk. For any suggestions, updates, credits or correction requests, contact us or comment below.
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Top 100 Bugtong Collection

The Top 100 Bugtong Collection
➢ Bugtong is the Filipino version of riddle in the Philippines. It is a statement or phrase with a double or hidden meaning, and which requires ingenuity to properly answer.
Bugtongs entail smart analysis, logic and common sense to solve its riddle. Some bugtongs may have rhymes, while most take a poetic form. Truly, bugtong is proudly a Filipino homebrew.
Top 100 Bugtong Collection
In Philippine literature, bugtongs describe the daily lives, customs and the mindset of the Filipino. It is an essential intellectual pasttime for the Filipinos since time immemorial.
Top 100 Bugtong Collection Question and Answer list

  • Bumili ako ng alipin, mataas pa sa akin.
  • ANSWER: Sumbrero

  • Isang bayabas, pito ang butas.
  • ANSWER: Ulo ng tao

  • Dumaan ang hari, nagkagatan ang mga pari.
  • ANSWER: Siper

  • Munting hayop na pangahas, aaligid-aligid sa ningas.
  • ANSWER: Gamu-gamo

  • Isang butil ng palay, sakot ang buong buhay.
  • ANSWER: Ilaw

  • Tinaga ko ang puno, sa dulo nagdurugo.
  • ANSWER: Gumamela

  • Ako ay may kaibigan, kasama ko kahit saan.
  • ANSWER: Anino

  • Kumot ng hari, hindi mahati-hati.
  • ANSWER: Tubig

  • Hindi naman hari, hindi naman pare, nagsusuot ng sarisari.
  • ANSWER: Sampayan

  • Dugtong-dugtong, magkakarugtong, tanikalang umuugong.
  • ANSWER: Tren

  • Naabot na ng kamay, ipinagawa pa sa tulay.
  • ANSWER: Kubyertos

  • Kastila kung natutulog kapag gising ay tagalog.
  • ANSWER: Mantika

  • Nakatalikod na ang prinsesa, ang mukha'y nakaharap pa.
  • ANSWER: Balimbing

  • Isang magandang senyora, ligid na ligid ng espada.
  • ANSWER: Pinya

  • Baha ni Ka Huli, Haligi'y bali-bali, Ang Bubong ay Sawali
  • ANSWER: Alimango

  • Baboy ko sa pulo, ang balahibo'y pako.
  • ANSWER: Langka

  • Kadena'y isinabit, sa batok nakakawit.
  • ANSWER: Kuwintas

  • Ginto sa kalangitan, Di matitigtitigan
  • ANSWER: Araw

  • Alipin ng hari, hindi makalakad, kung hindi itali.
  • ANSWER: Sapatos

  • Kahit gaano linisin, marumi pa rin ang tingin
  • ANSWER: Baboy

  • Maliit pa si kumare, marunong ng humuni.
  • ANSWER: Kuliglig

  • Bahay ng Salita, Imbakan ng Diwa
  • ANSWER: Aklat

  • Heto na si lulong, Bubulong bulong.
  • ANSWER: Bubuyog

  • Ang mukha'y parang tao, magaling lumukso.
  • ANSWER: Matsing

  • Araw araw bagong buhay, Taun-taon namamatay.
  • ANSWER: Kalendaryo

  • Tubig ng pinagpala, walang makakuha kundi munting bata.
  • ANSWER: Gatas ng ina

  • Mula berde naging mapula, Napakatamis ng lasa, Sinunungkit ni Ara
  • ANSWER: Aratiles

  • Iyak na pasigaw sa kadiliman, para bang tahol nio kamatayan.
  • ANSWER: Alulong

  • Isang Kulisap, kikislap-kislap
  • ANSWER: Alitaptap

  • Ang katawan ay bala, ang bituka'y paminta.
  • ANSWER: Papaya

  • Inisip ng marunong, Sinabi ng gunggong.
  • ANSWER: Bugtong

  • Naligo ang senyora, hindi nabasa ang saya.
  • ANSWER: Dahon ng gabi

  • Sa araw ay bungbong, sa gabi ay dahon.
  • ANSWER: Banig

  • Mahabang-mahaba, tinutungtungan ng madla.
  • ANSWER: Daan o Kalsada

  • Yumuko man ang reyna, di malalaglag ang korona.
  • ANSWER: Bayabas

  • Pagpanhik ng Bata, Tumutumba ang Matanda
  • ANSWER: Bagong Taon

  • Sa araw nahimhimbing at sa gabi ay gising.
  • ANSWER: Paniki

  • Maitim na parang alkitran, Pumuputi kahit hindi labhan.
  • ANSWER: Buhok

  • Baka ko sa palupandan, unga'y nakakarating kahit saan.
  • ANSWER: Kulog

  • Isda ko sa Maribeles, nasa loob ang kaliskis.
  • ANSWER: Sili

  • Kung sa ilan ay walang kwenta, Sa gusali ay mahalaga
  • ANSWER: Bato

  • Pag-aari mo, dala-dala mo, datapuwa't madalas gamitin ng iba kaysa iyo.
  • ANSWER: Pangalan

  • Dalawang magkaibigan, may talim ang tiyan; matagal ng nagkakagatan di pa nagkakasakitan.
  • ANSWER: Gunting

  • May bintana nguni't walang bubungan, may pinto nguni't walang hagdanan.
  • ANSWER: Kumpisalan

  • Di man isda, di naman itik, nakahuhuni kung ibig, maging sa kati maging sa tubig, ang huni'y nakakabuwisit.
  • ANSWER: Palaka

  • Nagsaing si Hudas, kinuha ang hugas, itinapon ang bigas.
  • ANSWER: Gata

  • Hinila ko ang baging, sumigaw ang matsing.
  • ANSWER: Kampana o Batingaw

  • Utusan kong walang paa't bibig, sa lihim ko'y siyang naghahatid, pag-inutusa'y di n babalik.
  • ANSWER: Sobre

  • Heto, heto na, di mo nakikita.
  • ANSWER: Hangin

  • Nagtago si Pedro, nakalitaw ang ulo.
  • ANSWER: Pako sa sahig

  • Malaking supot ni Mang Jacob, kung sisidlan ay pataob.
  • ANSWER: Kulambo

  • Heto na si Kaka, bubuka-bukaka.
  • ANSWER: Gunting

  • Kung nakahiga'y patagilid, kung nakatayo'y patiwarik.
  • ANSWER: Gulok o Itak

  • May puno walang bunga, may dahon walang sanga.
  • ANSWER: Sandok

  • Dalawang magkaibigan, habulan nang habulan.
  • ANSWER: Paa

  • Magandang prinsesa, nakaupo sa tasa.
  • ANSWER: Kasoy

  • Nagbibigay na, sinasakal pa.
  • ANSWER: Bote

  • Naligo ang senyora, hindi nabasa ang saya.
  • ANSWER: Dahon ng gabi

  • Pitong bundok, pitong lubak, tigpitong anak.
  • ANSWER: Sungkahan

  • Isa ang pasukan, tatlo ang labasan.
  • ANSWER: Kamiseta

  • Heto na si kuya, May sunong sa baga.
  • ANSWER: Alitaptap

  • Lumuluha walang mata, lumalakad walang paa.
  • ANSWER: Ballpen o Pluma

  • Sa maling kalabit, may buhay na kapalit.
  • ANSWER: Baril

  • Ako'y may kaibigan, Kasama ko kahit saan, Mapatubig ay di nalulunod, Mapaapoy ay di nasusunog.
  • ANSWER: Anino

  • Dalawang punsu-punsuhan, ang laman ay kaligtasan.
  • ANSWER: Dibdib ng Ina

  • Tubig kung sa isda, Lungga kung sa daga, Kung sa tao'y ano kaya.
  • ANSWER: Bahay

  • Inutusan ko ng umaga, Nang umuwi'y gabi na.
  • ANSWER: Araw

  • Baston ng kapitan, Hindi mahawakan.
  • ANSWER: Ahas

  • Hindi tao, hindi hayop, kung uminom ay salup-salop.
  • ANSWER: Batya

  • Walang bibig, walang pakpak, Kahit hari'y kinakausap.
  • ANSWER: Aklat

  • Sa buhatan ay may silbi, sa igiban ay walang sinabi.
  • ANSWER: Bayong o Basket

  • Mataas ang paupo, Kesa patayo.
  • ANSWER: Aso

  • Dinadala ko siya, Dinadala ako niya.
  • ANSWER: Bakya o Tsinelas

  • Buto't balat lumilipad.
  • ANSWER: Saranggola

  • Tubig na nagiging bato, Bato na nagiging tubig.
  • ANSWER: Asin

  • Dalawang bangyasan, naghahagaran.
  • ANSWER: Binti

  • Isang bayabas, pito ang butas.
  • ANSWER: Mukha

  • Tubo sa punso, walang buko.
  • ANSWER: Buhok

  • Limang puno ng niyog, isa'y matayog.
  • ANSWER: Daliri

  • Heto , heto na, Malayo pa'y humahalakhak na.
  • ANSWER: Alon

  • Dalawang balahibuhin, masarap pagdaitin.
  • ANSWER: Mata at Kilay

  • Isang balong malalim, punong-puno ng patalim.
  • ANSWER: Bibig

  • Dalawang batong maitim, malayo ang dinarating.
  • ANSWER: Mata

  • Dalawang balon, hindi malingon.
  • ANSWER: Tenga

  • Naligo ang kapitan, hindi nabasa ang tiyan.
  • ANSWER: Bangka

  • Limang puno ng niyog, isa'y matayog.
  • ANSWER: Mga Daliri

  • Maikling landasin, di maubos lakarin.
  • ANSWER: Anino

  • Hindi hayop, hindi tao, pumupulupot sa tiyan mo.
  • ANSWER: Sinturon

  • Pinakain ko nang pinakain, Pagkatapos ay ibinitin.
  • ANSWER: Bingwit

  • Dala mo dala ka, dala ka ng iyong dala.
  • ANSWER: Sapatos

  • Maliit pa si Kumpare, nakakaakyat na sa tore.
  • ANSWER: Langgam

  • Ang ilalim ay impyerno, Ibabaw ay purgatoryo, Gitna'y makakain mo.
  • ANSWER: Bibingka

  • May katawa'y walang bituka, May puwit walang paa, Nakakagat tuwina.
  • ANSWER: Baso

  • Kung kailan mo pinatay, saka pa humaba ang buhay.
  • ANSWER: Kandila

  • Nang sumipot sa maliwanag, kulubot na ang balat.
  • ANSWER: Ampalaya

  • Nakalantay kung gabi, Kung araw ay nakatabi.
  • ANSWER: Banig

  • Isang hayop na maliit, dumudumi ng sinulid.
  • ANSWER: Gagamba

  • Dalawang libing, laging may hangin.
  • ANSWER: Ilong

  • Malapit sa tingin, hindi marating
  • ANSWER: Langit

  • Hindi akin, hindi iyo, ari ng lahat ng tao.
  • ANSWER: Mundo

written by Rock Punzalan for Pinoy Search Network
FAIR USE DISCLAIMER: The following data is for educational, scholarship review and archiving purposes only. By viewing this information, you release the website and its authors from any responsibility or liabilities. Though we verify and maintain the accuracy of the provided data, the absence of unintented typographical and factual errors cannot be guaranteed. Use the page at your own risk. For any suggestions, updates, credits or correction requests, contact us or comment below.
Like Us
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  • Top 50 Must-Try Fruits in the Philippines
  • Top 100 Bugtong Collection
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  • Ninoy Aquino - The Filipino is worth dying for
  • Baybayin, not Alibata is the ancient Filipino writing system
 
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Top 50 Must-Try Fruits in the Philippines

Top 50 Must-Try Fruits in the Philippines
➢ Pinoy Search Network list of 50 must-try Fruits available in the Philippines. These locally grown fruits are not necesarrily native but are abundant enough to merit recognition as part of daily Filipino cuisine. As a tropical territory, the Philippines grows several delectable fruits of varying sizes, flavors and colors. All these fruits are harvested all-year round. For plurality, we also included some sweet crops.
Top 50 Must-Try Fruits in the Philippines
Most of the fruits included on this list are from fruit trees. Fruits sold in the markets, not grown locally and are only acquired through importations are not included in the list. As a bonus, we have included five more fruits in the list for you try.
The Philippines fruit industry is an important driver of the nation's economy. The major fruit species grown in the country include Banana, Pineapple, Mango, Papaya, Calamansi, Durian, Jackfruit and Lanzones based on volume of production. The major fruit exporters are Banana, Pineapple and Mango. Philippines ranked 2nd in global production of Pineapple (2.5 million tons in 2013), 4th in Banana worldwide (9.2 Million tonnes - 2012) and Mango production, 7th (2004) globally.
1 Mangga (Mango)
fruit_mangga ➢ National fruit of the Philippines. A juicy stone fruit which tastes sharply sour when raw, but delectably sweet when ripe. Significantly high in Vitamin C and Folate. ➢ Varieties: Indian mango, Apple Mango, Carabao Mango

➢ Region: Guimaras, Cebu, Zambales and Davao

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
2 Aratiles (Muntingia)
fruit_aratiles ➢ These tiny berries are sweet to the taste and has an inedible skin. Popular to children, Aratiles normally grows in residential backyards.

➢ Region: Residential Backyard

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
3 Durian
fruit_durian ➢ Known as king of all tropical fruits, spiked fruit Durian is sweet, savory and creamy. It emits an unusually strong offensive odor. Purported to be an aphrodisiac, it has become a staple in candies, milkshakes and ice creams. It is rich in Vitamins B1, B6 and C.

➢ Region: Davao province

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
4 Kamias (Bilimbi)
fruit_kamias ➢ Sour and eaten raw with rock salt. Good as a sweet pickle relish. Can be cured and made as ingredient for Sinigang or Paksiw.

➢ Region: Residential Backyard

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
5 Pakwan (Watermelon)
fruit_pakwan ➢ As its english name suggests, Pakwan is watery, sweet, crunchy and fibrous. It has a distinctive red color. Pakwan is rich in vitamin C.

➢ Region: Central Luzon

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
6 Lansones (Lanzones)
fruit_lansones ➢ Lanzones may look like smooth small potatoes but its edible fruit is sweet, sour and sometimes bitter. The bitter taste is attributed to the sap it contains. Its skin is thick and inedible.

➢ Region: Guimaras, Laguna, Batangas, Quezon, Butuan, Cagayan De Oro, Camiguin

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
7 Pinya (Pineapple)
fruit_pinya ➢ Pinya can be consumed raw, in can, cooked or juiced. It is very rich in Vitamin C and Manganese. Though very nutritious, Pinya is contraindicated for pregnant mothers.

➢ Region: Nueva Vizcaya, Bukidnon

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
8 Chesa o Tiesa (Canistel or Egg Fruit)
fruit_chesa ➢ Chesa is a sweet orange-yellow fruit with a texture comparable to a boiled egg-yolk. Chesa is very rich in Vitamin B3 and C.

➢ Region: Residential Backyard

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
9 Macopa (Water Apple or Rose Apple)
fruit_macopa ➢ Crunchy pinkish fruit the size of a tomato. When fully ripe, this bell-shaped fruit has a shiny red texture. Also known as Tambis, it is watery and bland to the tongue.

➢ Region: Residential Backyard

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
10 Abokado (Avocado)
fruit_avocado ➢ Popular in Milk Shakes, Salads, Tortas, Guacamole and Ice Creams, Avocado has a high monounsaturated fat content. It is rich in Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid), B6, B9 (Folate), K and Potassium.

➢ Region: CAR, Region 2

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
11 Rambutan
fruit_rambutan ➢ The cousin of Lychee and Longan, red-hair Rambutan has a smooth flesh that envelopes a large inedible seed. It is mildly sweet in taste. It is rich in Vitamin B3 (Niacin) and Manganese.

➢ Region: Laguna, Batangas, Nueva Vizcaya, Mindoro, Panay Island and Mindanao

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
12 Atis (Sugar Apple)
fruit_atis ➢ Atis is sweet and creamy like custard. It is rich in Vitamin C and Manganese. It is remarkable for its pulpy segments containing black inedible seeds.

➢ Region: Residential Backyard

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
13 Langka (Jackfruit)
fruit_langka ➢ Langka has a distinctive fruity and sweet aroma. The flesh flavor tastes like the combination of mango, banana, apple and pineapple. Its sweetness is amazingly balanced. It is usually included in jams, halo-halo, ginataan and turon. Langka is rich in Vitamin C, B6 and Magnesium.

➢ Region: Zambales, Isabela, Quirino and CAR

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
14 Santol (Cottonfruit)
fruit_santol ➢ Santols's flesh near the seeds may be sweet or extremely sour. It also contains inedible brown seeds. It is used in jams and as an ingredient to Sinigang.

➢ Region: Residential Backyards

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
15 Melon (Cantaloupe)
fruit_melon ➢ Popular in cold juice and salads, Melon is a refreshingly sweet and fleshy fruit.

➢ Region: Residential Backyards

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
16 Kaimito (Star Apple)
fruit_caimito ➢ Kaimito is a purple skinned dessert fruit. It is delicious to taste, but the skin and rind contain latex which is not edible. Its flesh cross section resembles a star-shaped flower.

➢ Region: Residential Backyards

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
17 Chico (Sapodilla or Zapota)
fruit_chico ➢ Brought to the Philippines by the Spanish through Mexico, the flesh is pale yellow in color. The fruit tastes sweet and malty. Its aroma resembles the smell of fine wine. It is rich in Vitamin C and Iron.

➢ Region: Residential Backyards

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
18 Suha (Pomelo)
fruit_suha ➢ The largest known Citrus fruit variety, Suha is famous in drink mixes. It is also eaten raw with rock salt. Pomelo is very rich in Vitamin C. It is usually yellow or greenish in color, and pinkish when ripened.

➢ Region: Davao

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
19 Saging (Banana)
fruit_banana ➢ Known as a complete food, it can be eaten ripe, or as a plantain when used in cooking. Usually elongated and curved, it is rich in Vitamin B6, Manganese and Potassium. Variety: Saba, (Morado) Gloria, Lacatan, Latundan, Senorita, Cavendish, Bungulan

➢ Region: Quirino, Isabela, Davao

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
20 Dalanghita (Mandarin Orange)
fruit_dalanghita ➢ A sub-variety of Citrus, Dalandan is mildly sweet and sharply sour just like Calamansi when raw. Dalanghita is rich in Vitamin C.

➢ Region: Nueva Vizcaya, Quezon, Aurora, Residential Backyards

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
21 Buko (Coconut)
fruit_buko ➢ Known as the Tree of Life, Buko is considered to be a very healthy and delectable drupe. Coconut meat and juice remain popular throughout the streets of the Philippines. It is usually made as an ingredient in ice cream, milk shakes, salads, vinegar, wines and rice cakes. Buko is rich in Iron, Manganese, Zinc, Folate (B9), Protein and Saturated Fats. Philippines is considered as one of the biggest producer of coconut in the world.

➢ Region: Aurora, Quezon, Pangasinan, Visayas, Mindanao, Residential Backyards

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
22 Bayabas (Guava)
fruit_bayabas ➢ The skin is usually rough and green, with the flesh varying in colors green, yellow and pink. The pulp may be sweet and sour. It is used in Sinigang and in fruit jams. It is incredibly rich in Vitamin C (275%), Fiber and also in Potassium.

➢ Region: Residential Backyards

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
23 Guyabano (Soursop)
fruit_guyabano ➢ Popular in Juices, Guyabano tastes sweet and sour. Many described its taste as a combination of strawberry, pineapple and citrus. Soursop is rich in Vitamin C, Magnesium and Potassium. It was brought to the Philippines by the Spanish from Mexico.

➢ Region: Residential Backyards

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
24 Presa (Strawberry)
fruit_presa ➢ Presa is popular for its aroma, bright red color, small seedlings, juicy texture and sweetness. Strawberry is famous in milk shakes, ice cream, juices, cakes, preserves and perfumes. Presa is rich in Vitamin C and Manganese. Obviously not a native Filipino fruit, Presa grows in regions with high altitude and cold weather.

➢ Region: Baguio, Benguet, Camarines Sur

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
25 Kalamansi (Calamansi or Calamondin)
fruit_kalamansi ➢ Kalamansi is Citro Fortunella hybrid. Used as a staple ingredient in steaks, as a partner in tonics, and popular in sour juice marmalade. It is famous in its raw state, than when ripened. Sour to taste, Kalamansi is high in Vitamin C.

➢ Region: Residential Backyards

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
26 Siniguelas (Jocote)
fruit_siniguelas ➢ Raw Siniguelas are eaten together with rock salt. Red and ripe Jocote meanwhile is very sweet to the taste.

➢ Region: Residential Backyards

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
27 Papaya
fruit_papaya ➢ Ripe Papaya is yellowish outside with an orange flesh. Raw Papaya, meanwhile, is dark green with a greenish white flesh and a charcteristic sticky sap. Raw Papayas are usually cooked (Tinola) while ripened papayas are delectably sweet and milky. It is rich in Vitamin C, Folate (B9) and Lycopene. The raw fruit is contraindicated for pregnant mothers.

➢ Region: Residential Backyards

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
28 Singkamas (Jicama, Mexican Yam Bean or Mexican Turnip)
fruit_singkamas ➢ Though not considered a fruit but a vine, Singkamas is a favorite street staple for Filipinos. It is best consumed with Bagoong, and as part of Lumpiang Hubad. Jicama is high in Vitamin C and Dietary Fiber.

➢ Region: Street Food

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
29 Duhat (Java Plum)
fruit_duhat ➢ Duhat is oblong, ovoid, starts in green color, then turns shining crimson black as it ripens. The taste is a mix of sweet, sour and astringent flavours. It is famous for the purple stain it leaves in the toungue and hands. Duhat is rich in Vitamin C, Iron and Magnesium.

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
30 Balimimbing (Carambola)
fruit_balimbing ➢ Crisp texture with a waxy yellow outer skin. Star-shaped cross section with a variation of sour to mildly sweet taste.

➢ Region: Residential Backyards

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
31 Dalandan (Seville Orange or Bitter Orange)
fruit_dalandan ➢ Another sub-variety of Citrus, Dalandan is great for making Orange Marmalade. It is sour and bitter to the taste.

➢ Region: Residential Backyards

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
32 Mansanas (Apple)
fruit_mansanas ➢ The popularly sweet Mansanas is not native to the Philippines, but its common to find Apples in the Philippine cuisine. Apple skin is usually dark red and crunchy, while the flesh is usually yellow to pale white in color. Though not nutritionally loaded, Apple contains Flavonoids and Phytochemicals essential to human health.

➢ Region: Mountain Province, Camarines Sur

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
33 Ubas (Grapes)
fruit_ubas ➢ Ubas is a fruiting berry, famous for wines, juice, raisins, salads, jelly, and extracts. Usually purple in color, Grapes are high in Vitamin K, Polyphenols, Resveratrol and Antioxidants.

➢ Region: Mountain Province, La Union

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
34 Kahel (Valencia Orange)
fruit_kahel ➢ Kahel is a sweet orange hybrid. Sweet and sour to taste it is mainly grown in the Mountain Province. Oranges are high in Vitamin C and Flavonoids.

➢ Region: Mountain Province, Camarines Sur

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
35 Sampaloc (Tamarind) Ripe
fruit_sampaloc ➢ Sampaloc is a pod-like fruit popularly made into sweetened sour candies and is a vital part of Sinigang and Sinampalukang Manok. Tamarind has a fleshy, juicy and sour acidic pulp. Brown or Reddish skin indicates its maturity. Raw consumption of the fruit is only applicable when the Sampaloc is ripened. Sampaloc is high in Vitamin B1 (Thiamine), B2 (Riboflavin), B3 (Niacin), Magnesium, Iron, Phosporous, Potassium and Calcium.

➢ Region: Residential Backyards

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
36 Kamote (Sweet Potato)
fruit_kamote ➢ Popular as a deep fried Kamote Que, Sweet Potato is a major staple in Filipino cuisine. Not considered a fruit, but an edible tuberous root crop, Camote is usually yellow, red, violet or beige in color. Camote is very high in Vitamin A (120%), B5 (Pantothenic Acid), B6, Manganese, Potassium and Phosporous

➢ Region: Residential Backyards

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
37 Manggustin or Mangosteen (Purple Mangosteen)
fruit_kamote
➢ Mangosteen is popular in teas and herbal capsules. Its fruit is sweet, tangy, juicy, fibrous and sour, while the purple rind is inedible. Nutritionally deficient, Mangosteen makes-up with Phytochemicals like Xanthonoids. It is also usually prepared for traditional medicine.

➢ Region: Davao

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
38 Peras (Pears)
fruit_peras ➢ Peras is not native to the Philippines but must have come from East Asian countries by trade. Just like Apple, Pear skin is crunchy, with the flesh peculiarly sweet, grainy and watery.

➢ Region: Mountain Province

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
39 Limon (Lemon)
fruit_lemon ➢ Aromatic Lemon is famous in teas, cocktail drinks, cuisines, marinades, soft drinks and juices. Its zest is popular in baked goodies and other dishes. Just like Dayap, Limon is a known antidote to Scurvy. Lemon possesses a good amount of Vitamin C and Phytochemicals.

➢ Region: Mountain Province

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
40 Hagis (Syzygium)
fruit_hagis ➢ This beautiful cherry red Hagis is a sour fruit usually consumed with rock salt. It is popular as a juice, marmalade or jelly.

➢ Region: Bicol Region, Davao

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
41 Dayap (Lime)
fruit_dayap ➢ Dayap a known antidote to scurvy, is high in Vitamin C, and Phytochemicals like Polyphenols and Terpenes. Dayap is popular in cocktails, tonics, margaritas, marmalade and perfumes.

➢ Region: Mountain Province

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
42 Kamansi (Seeded Breadfruit)
fruit_kamansi ➢ Notoriously similar in appearance to Langka or Jackfruit, Kamansi is a fruit rich in starch which turns to glucose when ripe. It is said to taste like potato or a baked bread when cooked. Kamansi is high in Vitamin C, Potassium and B1 (Thiamine).

➢ Region: Residential Backyards

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
43 Lipote (Jambolan Plum)
fruit_lipote ➢ It can be compared to Duhat, but Lipote differs greatly since it grows in clusters like Grapes. It has a purple to almost black colored skin, with a sweet and sour taste when ripened. It is high in Vitamin C.

➢ Region: Visayas, Bicol

Credits: Flickr
44 Mabolo or Kamagong Fruit or Tálang (Velvet Apple or Butter Fruit)
fruit_mabolo ➢ Pink colored Mabolo looks like an apple at first glance, but its smell is comparable to rotten cheese or feline feces. It tastes like fruit cream cheese.

➢ Region: Bohol, Residential Backyards

Credits: Flickr
45 Bulala (Pulasan)
fruit_bulala ➢ Often confused with Rambutan, Bulala is a sweeter version and the rarer fruit between the two. It also has spikes, but not the hairy spines that Rambutan has. Also, the seed is edible in contrast to Rambutan.

➢ Region: Residential Backyards

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
46 Galo or Salungugapit (Galonut)
fruit_galo ➢ Galo is an oval shaped fruit in green color that can be consumed raw or cooked by boiling or roasting.

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
47 Bignay (Salamander Fruit)
fruit_bignay ➢ Red to Purple in color, Bignay is a fruit which grows from a shrub. It tastes sour and is usually made into tea, liquor or jam.

➢ Region: Batangas, Visayas

Credits: Fruitipedia
48 Anonas (Custard Apple or Bull's Heart)
fruit_anonas ➢ A heart shaped compound fruit, Anonas skin contains knobby warts. Ripened flesh is creamy white in appearance.

➢ Region: Residential Backyards

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
49 Biriba (Wild Sweet Sop or Wild Cashina)
fruit_biriba ➢ Prepared as juice or in sorbetes due to its creamy texture, Biriba is shaped like a heart and contains numerous hexagonal protrusions.

➢ Region: Residential Backyards

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
50 Sapinit (West Indian Raspberry or Roseleaf Bramble)
fruit_sapinit ➢ A fruit that grows from a shrub, Sapinit possesses a sweet, sour and bitter taste perfect for marmalade, juice, wine or jam. It is known to treat Alzheimer's disease.

➢ Region: Mount Banahaw

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
Honorable Mention:
51 Marang (Artocarpus Odoratissimus or Tarap)
fruit_marang ➢ Marang (related to Jackfruit) is a staple fruit of Davao together with Durian. It is said to smell almost like Durian though not as pungent, yet superior in taste compared to the Jackfruit. Marang tastes like a juicy Banana with a mild creamy texture. It is advised that the fruit not be ripened thoroughly to preserve the taste, and must be consumed within hours of opening since oxidation may affect its taste.

➢ Region: Davao Region

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
52 Susong Kalabaw (Uvaria Rufa Fruit or Blume or Carabao Teats)
fruit_susongkalabaw ➢ The fruits of Uvaria Rufa possess a sharp sweet-sour taste and are edible. The fruit got it's namesake since the shape resembles the anatomy of the Carabao's teats.

➢ Region: Northern Luzon, Bulacan, Romblon, Palawan and Mindanao

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
53 Pitaya or (Dragon Fruit)
fruit_dragonfruit ➢ Dragon Fruit is a native cactus fruit from Mexico. It is now popularly grown in Southeast Asia, with the Philippines steadily growing in farm production. The fruit is a high source of Vitamin C, Potassium, Lipids and Fibers which are touted to prevent certain cancers. The seeds are nutty and likened to Kiwifruit seeds, while the taste is described to be mildly sweet.

➢ Region: Cavite, Rizal, Laguna, Ilocos Norte

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
54 Pasyenarya or Garanadina or Parang (Masaflora or Passion Fruit)
fruit_passionfruit ➢ Locally known as either Pasyenarya or Garanadina or Parang, Passion Fruit is a good source of Vitamin C, Riboflavin and Fibers. The pulpy skin is hard but can be pressed open with two hands. It has a watery interior with seeds which may either look like chicken eyes or tadpoles. The fruit is popular in mixed juices, jams, marmalades, salads, and fruit cocktail syrups.

➢ Region: Agusan, Cotabato, Davao

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
55 Granada or (Pomegranate)
fruit_granada ➢ Granada or more commonly known as Pomegranate is a fruit from a garden plant in the Philippines. It is also thought to be common in the wild. The juice of Pomegrenates contain anthocyanins, glucose, Vitamin C, ellagic acid, gallic acid, caffeic acid, catechin, quercetin, rutin, minerals, and proteins.

➢ Region: Garden Variety, Wild

Credits: Wikimedia Commons
written by Rock Punzalan for Pinoy Search Network
FAIR USE DISCLAIMER: The following data is for educational, scholarship review and archiving purposes only. By viewing this information, you release the website and its authors from any responsibility or liabilities. Though we verify and maintain the accuracy of the provided data, the absence of unintented typographical and factual errors cannot be guaranteed. Use the page at your own risk. For any suggestions, updates, credits or correction requests, contact us or comment below.
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Top Filipino Heroes and their favorite food

Top Filipino Heroes and their favorite food
➢ Pinoy Search Network lists for you the top Filipino Heroes and their favorite food. List includes Andres Bonifacio (Litson Manok sa Saha ng Saging), Lapu-Lapu (Sinigang na Isda sa Mangga), Gregorio del Pilar (Arroz a la Cubana), Gabriela Silang (Pinakbet na Ilocano), Melchora Aquino (Tinolang Manok Tagalog), Dr. Jose Rizal (Karneng Asada), Marcelo H del Pilar (Pochero), Juan Luna (Cold Cuts), Manuel L Quezon (Jambon de Smithfield), Ninoy Aquino (Sinigang na Bangus), Marcela Agoncillo (Pork Adobo sa Dilaw), Apolinario Mabini (Bulanglang), and Emilio Aguinaldo (Salmon with Hollandaise).
Top Filipino Heroes and their favorite food
Andres Bonifacio (1863-1897) Born: Tondo, Manila
Litson Manok sa Saha ng Saging
(Roasted or Chicken Lechon in Banana Trunk Sap)

➢ Known as Supremo, he was the Revolutionary Leader of the Katipunan. Historically the First President of the Philippines but not recognized legally and officially.
Top Filipino Heroes and their favorite food
Credits: Wikimedia Commons and ChoosePhilippines
Datu Lapu-Lapu (1491-1542) Born: Mactan, Cebu
Top Filipino Heroes and their favorite food
Credits: Wikimedia Commons and Pinterest
Sinigang na Isda sa Mangga
(Boiled Fish with Taro, Mango and Kangkong)

➢ Mactan Datu who led a native army to vanquish reknowned explorer Ferdinand Magellan. First Filipino to defy the Spanish colonial rule.
General Gregorio Del Pilar (1875-1899) Born: Bulacan, Bulacan
Arroz a la Cubana
(Fried Rice, Tomato Sauce, Fried Egg and Fried Banana)

Kakanin
(Glutinous Rice Cake Pudding with Shredded Coconut Toppings)

➢ 22 years old Katipunan Revolutionary. The Hero of the Battle of Tirad Pass
Top Filipino Heroes and their favorite food
Credits: Wikimedia Commons
Gabriela Silang (1731-1763) Born: Santa, Ilocos Sur
Top Filipino Heroes and their favorite food
Credits: WWikimedia Commons and Delio Klemen Cainglit
Pinakbet na Ilocano
(Bagnet Pork with Filipino Vegetables mix in Bagoong Fish Sauce)

➢ Revolutionary woman who fought against the Spaniards during the British occupation. Wife of another hero, Diego Silang
Melchora Aquino (1812-1919) Born: Balintawak, Caloocan
Tinolang Manok Tagalog
(Boiled Chicken Porridge in Ginger Soup)

➢ Known as the Mother of the Katipunan or "Tandang Sora". Was the most recognized medic of wounded Katipuneros.
Top Filipino Heroes and their favorite food
Credits: Wikimedia Commons and TravellingFeet
Dr. Jose Rizal (1861-1896) Born: Calamba, Laguna
Top Filipino Heroes and their favorite food
Credits: Pinterest and Wikimedia Commons
Karneng Asada
(Beefsteak with Sauce)

Tinolang Manok sa Kalabasa
(sometimes Sayote)

Minatamis na Santol
(Sweetened Santol)

➢ National Hero of the Philippines. Formed the Liga Filipina, the basis of the Philippine Revolution and wrote novels Noli Me Tangere and El Filibusterismo. Martyred in Bagumbayan via a firing squad.
Marcelo H. Del Pilar (1850-1896) Born: Bulacan, Bulacan
Pochero
(Beef and Pork Stew in Tomato, Banana and Potatoes)

➢ One of the main Ilustrados and proponent of the La Liga Filipina. He wrote for the La Soidaridad.
Top Filipino Heroes and their favorite food
Credits: Wikimedia Commons and Kusina101
Juan Luna (1857-1899) Born: Badoc, Ilocos Norte
Top Filipino Heroes and their favorite food
Credits: Wikimedia Common
Saumon Hollandaise
(Salmon with Hollandaise)

Averna
(Italian Liquor)

Giffard
(Blackberry Liquor)

Basi
(Ilocos Sugarcane Wine)

➢ Most notable for his exploits in the Arts. His painting of the Spolarium immortalized Luna's name in the annals of Philippine history. He was also a delegate to the United States to press for the recognition of the Philippine government.
Manuel Quezon (1878-1944) Born: Baler, Aurora
Jambon de Smithfield
(Smithfield Cured Ham)

Supreme de Vollaile
(Chicken Breasts in Lemon, Salt and Pepper)

➢ Second President of Philippines. Hailed as the Father of the Filipino language. He was the leader of the nation in the time of Japanese occupation and during the liberation.
Top Filipino Heroes and their favorite food
Credits: Wikimedia Commons and ElPortalDelChacinado
Benigno 'Ninoy' Aquino Jr. (1932-1983) Born: Concepcion, Tarlac
Top Filipino Heroes and their favorite food
Credits: Wikimedia Commons and Knorr.com.ph
Sinigang na Bangus
(Boiled Milkfish with Tamarind and Kangkong)

➢ Senator who defied Martial Law and its dictator President Ferdinand Marcos. He was martyred and assassinated in 1983 at the tarmac of Manila International Airport.
Marcela Agoncillo (1860-1946) Born: Taal, Batangas
Pork Adobo sa Dilaw
(Long-cooked Adobo without Soy Sauce but Ginger instead)

➢ Said to have sewn the Philippine national flag in only five (5) days.
Top Filipino Heroes and their favorite food
Credits: Wikimedia Commons
Apolinario Mabini (1864-1903) Born: Tanauan, Batangas
Top Filipino Heroes and their favorite food
Credits: Wikimedia Commons and PinoyCook
Bulanglang
(Vegetable staple composed of assorted veggies with no strict ingredients)

➢ Known as the Brains of the Philippine Revolution and also as the Sublime Paralytic.
Emilio Aguinaldo (1869-1964) Born: Kawit, Cavite
Saumon Hollandaise
(Salmon with Hollandaise)

Nilagang Manok na Puti
(with Asparagus)

Sardines Aux Tomates
(Sardines in Tomatoes)

Voi au vent ala Financiare
(Puff Pastry with Beef, Lengua, and Mushrooms in red wine)

➢ Declared the first Filipino President and was the leader of the Magdalo faction of the Katipunan. Thought to have had a hand in the betrayal of heroes Andres Bonifacio and General Antonio Luna
Top Filipino Heroes and their favorite food
Credits: Wikimedia Commons and andrewzimmern.com
written by Rock Punzalan for Pinoy Search Network
FAIR USE DISCLAIMER: The following data is for educational, scholarship review and archiving purposes only. By viewing this information, you release the website and its authors from any responsibility or liabilities. Though we verify and maintain the accuracy of the provided data, the absence of unintented typographical and factual errors cannot be guaranteed. Use the page at your own risk. For any suggestions, updates, credits or correction requests, contact us or comment below.
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The many names of Lapu-Lapu

The many names of Lapu-Lapu
➢ Many of us Filipinos may not have known that Lapu-Lapu had many names attributed to him. The first Filipino hero to have defied Spanish colonization, Lapu-Lapu was a ruling Datu of Mactan (now Lapu-Lapu City) island.
The famed Datu together with his soldiers (numbering to 1500) vanquished the Spanish world explorer Ferdinand Magellan on April 27, 1521 in the Battle of Mactan. The Spaniards failed to advance their colonization of the Philippines until another expedition by Miguel Lopez de Legaspi in 1564.
Lapu-Lapu was referred to by names of Çilapulapu, Si Lapulapu, Sri Lapulapu, Salip Pulaka, Cali Pulaco, and Lapulapu Dimantag. Lapu-Lapu was better known as Si Lapulapu. Italian historian Pigafetta called him Çilapulapu and Jose Rizal himself mentioned him as Si Lapu Lapu. The word "Si" is actually a corruption of the title "Sri". Sri is derived from the Sanskrit "Sri Pakuda" or "His Highness".
The many names of Lapu-Lapu
Lapu-Lapu Statue in Cebu from Wikimedia Commons
The many names of Lapu-Lapu
Credits: Lapu-Lapu Statue from GMA News
The many names of Lapu-Lapu
Credits: Manuel Pañares painting of the Battle of Mactan
Some historians tag Lapu-Lapu as a Moro in lieu of Salip and Cali, which could have been a reference to islamic titles Caliph or Kalifah. The Salip should correctly be attributed to derivations like Sarripada, Sipad, Paduka, Seri Paduka, and Salipada. Such names were used to honor the ancient Visayan Datus. Although some quarters would debate that Lapu-Lapu was a Moro migrant and outsider in Cebu, the common practice of tattooing, body piercing and alcohol consumption (which was a part of their culture) are prohibited in Islam.
written by Rock Punzalan for Pinoy Search Network
FAIR USE DISCLAIMER: The following data is for educational, scholarship review and archiving purposes only. By viewing this information, you release the website and its authors from any responsibility or liabilities. Though we verify and maintain the accuracy of the provided data, the absence of unintented typographical and factual errors cannot be guaranteed. Use the page at your own risk. For any suggestions, updates, credits or correction requests, contact us or comment below.
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Baybayin, not Alibata is the ancient Filipino writing system

Baybayin, not Alibata is the ancient Filipino writing system
➢ One major mistake of history includes the ancient Filipino writing system known to us as Baybayin. Majority of Pinoys mistake this traditional script as Alibata. This gigantic blot in Philippine history can be attributed to Paul Rodriguez Verzosa who mistook Baybayin to have come from the Arabic alphabet, and thus coined the term "Alif-Bata". Alif is the first letter in Arabic, and Aleph in Hebrew. It later became known as Alibata.
Baybayin, not Alibata is the ancient Filipino writing system
Photo Credits: Baybayin from SlideShare.Net
Baybayin, not Alibata is the ancient Filipino writing system
Photo Credits: Baybayin from Wikimedia Commons
Baybayin is made-up of 17 characters or letters that became widespread in the Islands of the Philippines in the sixteenth century (confirmed by Pedro Chirino and Antonio de Morga). It flourished until it eventually faded under the Spaniard yolk during the 19th century. Those familiar with Baybayin describes it as curvilinear in appearance. Recent research points to the brahmic Sanskrit script from India as a probable ancestor of the Baybayin script. It may had been brought to Filipino shores by the Indian barter traders. Since 900 AD, researchers noted that there were traces of advanced writings in the Philippines (Laguna Copperplate Inscription).
Baybayin comes from the word "Baybay" in ancient Tagalog which meant "to spell" or "syllable" in Filipino. This form of classical script probably disappeared from national consciousness since Filipinos did not traditionally store-up writing scrolls like the Egyptians, Chinese and the Japanese did. The colonizing Spaniards also burned many Baybayin manuscripts to institute their own religious and cultural systems. However, Spanish clergy preserved it by documenting the script, with UST Manila holding the largest archive of Baybayin known presently.
Other scripts of Brahmic origins known in the Philippines include Buhid, Hanunó'o, Kulitan and Tagbanwa.
Note: Paul Verzosa was a member of the National Language Institute in 1939. He coined the erroneous term Alibata in year 1921.

References

• Morrow, Paul. "Baybayin, the Ancient Philippine script". MTS. Retrieved September 4, 2008
• Archives, University of Santo Tomas, retrieved June 17, 2012.
• "Tagalog (Baybayin, Alibata)". SIL International. Retrieved October 10, 2014.
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